Website Assists North Carolina Employers With Reporting Work Injuries to OSHA

A new interactive web tool created by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) was recently unveiled to assist users in finding out what illnesses and injuries are recordable and work-related according to OSHA’s Record keeping rules.

Our workers’ compensation lawyers in Hickory and elsewhere hope this tool will benefit North Carolina workers who are injured at work or become ill from a work-related task.
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The interactive tool, OSHA Recordkeeping Advisor, replicates how an employer would interact with an expert on Recordkeeping rules. The user supplies confidential information via questions that are relevant to the situation. Any information entered by the user is not stored or recorded. Employers assisted by the tool can determine:

  • If an illness or injury is work-related
  • If an exposure or event on travel or at home is work-related.
  • Does an exception apply to the illness or injury?
  • Does a work-related illness or injury need to be recorded.
  • Which conditions of the directives apply when documenting a work-related illness or injury?

“The Recordkeeping Advisor was developed to better help employers understand and comply with their responsibilities to report and record work-related injuries and illnesses,” said Assistant Secretary of Labor for Occupational Safety and Health Dr. David Michaels.

OSHA’s Injury and Illness Recordkeeping page has links to the Recordkeeping Advisor, the Recordkeeping Handbook, a tutorial on filling out Recordkeeping forms and other useful information, all in the effort to assist employers in understanding and complying with Federal reporting and recordkeeping requirements.

A session with the Advisor might go something like this:

Advisor: Is the involved person on your organization’s or company payroll?
User input: Yes
Advisor: Did an exposure or event occurring in the work environment contribute or cause the resulting illness or injury, or greatly aggravate a pre-existing illness or injury?
User input: Yes, it contributed or caused the resulting condition or it “greatly aggravated” a pre-existing condition.
Advisor: Did the exposure or event that contributed or caused the injury or illness, or “greatly aggravated” a pre-existing condition, occur while the involved person was working on the job site, during travel or at home?
User input: The exposure or event occurred while the involved person was working on a job site, in a company office or other company location.
Advisor: You indicated that: An exposure or event occurring in the work environment caused or contributed to the resulting illness or injury, or “greatly aggravated” a pre-existing illness or injury, and the exposure or event occurred while the involved person was working on a job site, in a company office or other company location. Based on the information provided, in accordance to OSHA regulations, this seems to be a work-related exposure or event. Please continue to find out if the illness or injury is recordable under OSHA regulations.

This tool is designed for companies to determine whether or not they will be liable to pay workers’ compensation benefits to an employee, but it may also be useful for those injured on the job. Those injured can use it to find out the same information an employer will find out about their situation.

If you or someone you know has been injured at a North Carolina job site and has had a claim denied, seek the help of the workers’ compensation lawyers at the Lee Law Offices, P.A. to get you the compensation you deserve. Call for a free no-obligation appointment at 1-800-887-1965.

More Blog Entries:

Failure to Train Employees can Lead to a High Risk of Injury in North Carolina Work Accidents, North Carolina Workers’ Compensation Lawyers Blog, July 1, 2011

Safe Work Environments can Reduce Risk of North Carolina Work Injuries, North Carolina Workers’ Compensation Lawyers Blog, June 17, 2011

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